Snow Time is Best Time

thepageofhopes:

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-Puella Magi Madoka Magica Classpect-

(Rebellion Spoilers)

Read More

Your mental health comes before school baby, always. If its midnight, and you have an exam the next day but your hands have been shaking for the past hour and a half and you’re not so sure you want to be alive anymore, pull out that carton of Ben and Jerry’s and afterwards, go the fuck to bed. So what if you get a 68% on the exam the next day? You took care of yourself and at the end of the day that will always come before a high test score. To hell with anyone who tells you differently.

Abbie Nielsen, Dear Future Daughter (via octobermoe)


Really needed this, especially since it’s exams week and my anxiety is overwhelming.

(via wolfmanssister)

Im going to tell my kids this.

(via perfectly-a-mermaid)

sarcoptid:

regalium:

IDK IF YOU KNOW ABOUT THIS WEBSITE YET, BUT I DON’T EVEN CARE IF YOU DO.

CHARAHUB BASICALLY ALLOWS YOU TO MAKE A DIRECTORY OF ALL YOUR OCS.

LIKE SO

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AND SO (they let you get super detailed)

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It lets you store 100 characters (you gain 2 extra slots…

arachnofiend:

chibisilverwings:

ambrromance:

joultonofblood:

Sums up their personalities pretty well.

Eddy: I can achieve anything
Edd: there’s a logical way to achieve what I want
Ed: there’s nothing standing in my way

Eddy hopping over the fence indicates his willingness to “cheat” the system, or to take a shortcut. Much like his schemes, it might end up being more work, but in his mind, cheating is the best way to get ahead.

Edd goes the neat and logical way, he’s straight forward. BUT, note that he closes the gate behind him rather than leaving it open. He’s incredibly meticulous and even if it’s more convenient to leave it open for anyone coming in behind him, he has to leave things neat, tidy and as he found them.

Ed is also is straight forward, he in fact is using the MOST direct route. But this route is one no one else would consider because it seems completely nonsensical. Which sums him up pretty well. The fact that it works for him is also fun to note. In general his earnestness and determination carries him through situations that most people would be stopped by.

I honestly never thought I’d see a critical analysis of Ed, Edd, and Eddy

badveganwolf:

imran-suleiman:

Photographer Mattias Klum from National Geographic gets close and personal with a lion.

"and all of a sudden you feel very small" damn right

itscherryamber:

amurrrka:

peace-love-sex-music:

STOP SAYING A VAGINA IS LOOSE BECAUSE OF A LOT OF SEX.

VAGINAS ALWAYS SHRINK TO THEIR USUAL TIGHTNESS AFTER SEX.

PENISES DO NOT STRETCH THEM OUT OF SHAPE AT ALL

THE VAGINA IS A REALLY STRONG MUSCLE NOT A FLABBY PIECE OF SKIN

WHEN A DUDE BRAGS ABOUT HOW TIGHT A VAGINA WAS

HE’S LITERALLY BRAGGING ABOUT HOW HE COULDN’T GET HIS PARTNER AROUSED.

WOW 4 FOR YOU, BOY.

Spread the word! Maybe one or two boys might actually get it.

galosengen:

i was like “that’s a cute cat” and then more just kept coming

bouncingquarians-inactive:

though I rarely make tutorials [or a halfassed guide in this case] I thought I could scribble out a few of my tips.

I’m by far one of the worst people to be giving any advice on this matter but heh I tried…

2,019 plays

asa-turney:

 

[ •  PoFV themes:   Reimu / Marisa / Sakuya / Youmu

Reisen / Cirno / Lyrica / Tewi / Aya Medicine / Komachi  • ]

 

Touhou 09   (Spring Lane ~ Colorful Path)

—-English fanlyrics—-

 

Now I may as well walk slowly down this path where colors blend,

As however fast or slow I go, I’m bound to reach the end.

 

There’s a path where petals fly, and flowers bloom, and colors blend.

And at every quiet clearing lies another hidden bend.

 

Each petal that flies might be some microcosm in disguise,

But what of it? Just how much of it is any of my concern?

 

I’ve seen many springs, coming too late or too soon,

But the flowers that bloom too much still fall by that next moon.

 

See the colors spin, in an endless ring of light.

From the other side, it’s a shadow of the night.

 

Each piece of a whole resides in perfect harmony.

Sitting right along this border is the righteous place for me.

 

Now I may as well walk slowly down this path where colors blend,

As however fast or slow I go, I’m bound to reach the end.

 

There’s a path where flowers bloom, and petals fly, and colors blend.

I will meet someone along this path, whomever it may send.

 

Each task I perform draws with a feeling misleadingly warm.

Sweeping up my necessary sins, until the cycle’s next turn?

 

Life returns to normal, whatever normal may be.

There I might find a paradise most humans seldom see.

 

See the colors spin, in an endless ring of light.

From the other side, it’s a shadow of the night.

 

Each piece of a whole resides in perfect harmony.

Sitting right along this border is the righteous place for me.

 

Now I may as well walk slowly down this path where colors blend,

As however fast or slow I go, I’m bound to reach the end…

 

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art-of-swords:

Sword Facts & Myths
All Medieval swords weighed at least 12 pounds – FALSE
Most Medieval swords weighed around 2.5 lbs - even long hand-and-a-half and two-handed swords weighed less than 4 lbs.
Medieval swords were not sharp - FALSE
Some surviving samples of Medieval swords are still sharp - many are razor-sharp.
All swords should balance within 2” of the guard - FALSE
A sword’s balance should be determined by its function, not an arbitrary standard. Swords intended for cutting often balance 5 or 6 inches from the guard.
Swords were made to cut through armour - FALSE
Period armour was often work- and case-hardened and curved such that it is difficult to hit at a right angle. Late Medieval thrusting swords, even the ones with a reinforced point, were used to thrust into the gaps in armour, not through the plate.
Viking swords were heavier than Medieval swords - FALSE
The Viking sword was a very highly developed sword form. Often the blades were quite thin in cross section, and as a result, were often the same or lighter in overall weight than other similarsized swords.
There is no such thing as the “perfect” sword - TRUE
There are only “perfect” swords for their intended purpose and the tastes of the owner.
A “good” sword should be able to bend past 90 degrees without taking a set - FALSE
Flexibility is only one of the aspects of the steel properties that is important in a sword. Too flexible, and it is inefficient in the thrust and the cut. Too stiff and it is prone to breakage. Most makers are content if a sword will bend to 45 degrees without taking a set.
Real swordfights were just like they are in the movies - FALSE
Swordfights in movies are choreographed for entertainment not authenticity. Edge to edge parries and fancy techniques are designed to heighten drama in a scene. An actual swordfight would be short, brutal and much quieter.
Japanese swords are the sharpest and best swords ever made - FALSE
Japanese swords have many admirable qualities and were well-suited to their intended use, but they are not necessarily sharper or better than a properly designed and sharpened Medieval sword. 
Medieval swordmakers were uneducated barbarians - FALSE
It is apparent from even a cursory study of surviving Medieval swords that blademakers and cutlers were highly skilled artisans with a profound understanding of mathematics and proportion.
Not all swords should be as sharp as a razor - TRUE
The sword’s intended purpose is always the guide to use — thrusting swords are not intended for cutting, so some may not even have an edge at all, just a well-defined and reinforced point.
Swords were tempered in urine or blood - FALSE
The steels smelted in Medieval Europe required either clean water or oil for quenching. Urine or blood would not allow a blade to temper properly.
The “blood groove” is on a sword to release pressure in the wound and allow the sword to come back out - FALSE
"Blood groove" as a term is a recent invention — "fuller" is the proper name for the groove or grooves on a sword blade. The purpose of the fuller has nothing to do with "blood" — fullers reduce weight, assist in the proper distribution of mass in a blade, and help make the blade more stiff.
A good sword can cut through a concrete pillar - FALSE
Swords were intended to cut through flesh, clothing, and (in earlier swords) leather or mail armour. They are not intended to cut wood, concrete or metal pillars, even though that is often seen in films.
A sword will fall apart if you don’t clean the tang of the sword - FALSE
The tang of a sword, if properly made and the rest of the sword properly maintained, will not require any maintenance for generations of use. 
Japanese folded steel is superior to European sword steel - FALSE
Folding steel was a technique used by Japanese smiths to try to get the best steel they could from very poor ore sources. Folded steel blades are more likely than modern monosteels to have large, unseen inclusions of impurities that may in fact critically weaken a blade. By folding the steel billet many, many times, they achieved a more even distribution of carbon and worked most of the impurities out of the steel. The result is stunningly beautiful, but we have to believe that if a 16th C Japanese smith had access to modern monosteels, he would have switched in a heartbeat.
Pattern-welded steel is superior to mono-steel - FALSE
Like folding steel, pattern-welding was a technique used to try to get the best steel from very poor ore sources.  Pattern-welding is the art of hammering together, and then twisting and re-hammering layers of iron (often of varying carbon content). The Celts as far back as the 5th century BC may have made swords by pattern-welding, and this technique was used extensively until at least the end of the 10th century.  After this, better, more consistent iron ore was obtainable, and furnace technology improved, making this laborious technique unnecessary. Also like folded steel blades, pattern welded blades are more likely than modern monosteels to have large, unseen inclusions of impurities that may in fact critically weaken a blade.
Swords are just big knives - FALSE
The design of a sword is far more complex than a knife. Flexibility  balance and vibration are far more critical in a sword-length blade than in a knife-length blade.

Info source: © 2005 Albion Armorers, Inc.
Photo source: © Royal Armouries

art-of-swords:

Sword Facts & Myths

  • All Medieval swords weighed at least 12 pounds – FALSE

Most Medieval swords weighed around 2.5 lbs - even long hand-and-a-half and two-handed swords weighed less than 4 lbs.

  • Medieval swords were not sharp - FALSE

Some surviving samples of Medieval swords are still sharp - many are razor-sharp.

  • All swords should balance within 2” of the guard - FALSE

A sword’s balance should be determined by its function, not an arbitrary standard. Swords intended for cutting often balance 5 or 6 inches from the guard.

  • Swords were made to cut through armour - FALSE

Period armour was often work- and case-hardened and curved such that it is difficult to hit at a right angle. Late Medieval thrusting swords, even the ones with a reinforced point, were used to thrust into the gaps in armour, not through the plate.

  • Viking swords were heavier than Medieval swords - FALSE

The Viking sword was a very highly developed sword form. Often the blades were quite thin in cross section, and as a result, were often the same or lighter in overall weight than other similarsized swords.

  • There is no such thing as the “perfect” sword - TRUE

There are only “perfect” swords for their intended purpose and the tastes of the owner.

  • A “good” sword should be able to bend past 90 degrees without taking a set - FALSE

Flexibility is only one of the aspects of the steel properties that is important in a sword. Too flexible, and it is inefficient in the thrust and the cut. Too stiff and it is prone to breakage. Most makers are content if a sword will bend to 45 degrees without taking a set.

  • Real swordfights were just like they are in the movies - FALSE

Swordfights in movies are choreographed for entertainment not authenticity. Edge to edge parries and fancy techniques are designed to heighten drama in a scene. An actual swordfight would be short, brutal and much quieter.

  • Japanese swords are the sharpest and best swords ever made - FALSE

Japanese swords have many admirable qualities and were well-suited to their intended use, but they are not necessarily sharper or better than a properly designed and sharpened Medieval sword. 

  • Medieval swordmakers were uneducated barbarians - FALSE

It is apparent from even a cursory study of surviving Medieval swords that blademakers and cutlers were highly skilled artisans with a profound understanding of mathematics and proportion.

  • Not all swords should be as sharp as a razor - TRUE

The sword’s intended purpose is always the guide to use — thrusting swords are not intended for cutting, so some may not even have an edge at all, just a well-defined and reinforced point.

  • Swords were tempered in urine or blood - FALSE

The steels smelted in Medieval Europe required either clean water or oil for quenching. Urine or blood would not allow a blade to temper properly.

  • The “blood groove” is on a sword to release pressure in the wound and allow the sword to come back out - FALSE

"Blood groove" as a term is a recent invention — "fuller" is the proper name for the groove or grooves on a sword blade. The purpose of the fuller has nothing to do with "blood" — fullers reduce weight, assist in the proper distribution of mass in a blade, and help make the blade more stiff.

  • A good sword can cut through a concrete pillar - FALSE

Swords were intended to cut through flesh, clothing, and (in earlier swords) leather or mail armour. They are not intended to cut wood, concrete or metal pillars, even though that is often seen in films.

  • A sword will fall apart if you don’t clean the tang of the sword - FALSE

The tang of a sword, if properly made and the rest of the sword properly maintained, will not require any maintenance for generations of use. 

  • Japanese folded steel is superior to European sword steel - FALSE

Folding steel was a technique used by Japanese smiths to try to get the best steel they could from very poor ore sources. Folded steel blades are more likely than modern monosteels to have large, unseen inclusions of impurities that may in fact critically weaken a blade. By folding the steel billet many, many times, they achieved a more even distribution of carbon and worked most of the impurities out of the steel. The result is stunningly beautiful, but we have to believe that if a 16th C Japanese smith had access to modern monosteels, he would have switched in a heartbeat.

  • Pattern-welded steel is superior to mono-steel - FALSE

Like folding steel, pattern-welding was a technique used to try to get the best steel from very poor ore sources.  Pattern-welding is the art of hammering together, and then twisting and re-hammering layers of iron (often of varying carbon content). The Celts as far back as the 5th century BC may have made swords by pattern-welding, and this technique was used extensively until at least the end of the 10th century.  After this, better, more consistent iron ore was obtainable, and furnace technology improved, making this laborious technique unnecessary. Also like folded steel blades, pattern welded blades are more likely than modern monosteels to have large, unseen inclusions of impurities that may in fact critically weaken a blade.

  • Swords are just big knives - FALSE

The design of a sword is far more complex than a knife. Flexibility  balance and vibration are far more critical in a sword-length blade than in a knife-length blade.

Info source: © 2005 Albion Armorers, Inc.

Photo source: © Royal Armouries